Those who harassed the organisers of the Philippine Independence Day celebrations; they are a disgrace to Singapore.

   Lee Hsien Loong

I was appalled to read about those who harassed the organisers of the Philippine Independence Day celebrations, and spammed their Facebook page. They are a disgrace to Singapore.

Fortunately this appears to be the work of few trolls. Heartened that many sensible Singaporeans condemn this thuggish behaviour, and support Tan Chuan-Jin’s stand on this issue <http://on.fb.me/1ml0Y4u>.

We must treat people in Singapore the way we ourselves expect to be treated overseas. Many Singaporeans live overseas, and are warmly welcomed in their adopted homes. I just attended our Singapore Day in London. How would we have felt if British netizens had spammed our website, and abused Singaporeans living in Britain?

We must show that we are generous of spirit and welcome visitors into our midst, even as we manage the foreign population here. Otherwise we will lower our standing in the eyes of the world, and have every reason to be ashamed of ourselves.  ~ LHL

Comments to share :

  • I fully agree with you Mr Lee. I am sure that if we were being attacked by other countries while celebrating National Day in their countries, we will be equally sad and rejected. If we are not open to the idea of celebrating on Orchard Road, all we need to do is to discuss and settle it in an civilized and gentleman way. The trolls on the net are simply hooligans. Out to destroy the very foundations of civilisation.  ~ Li
  • Most singaporeans have not really seen the rest of the world with their eyes therefore became a frog in their well. Critisize and complaints about almost everything when there are changes here and there. Hope that will change one of these years. ~ Melvin
  • Hope authorities will catch up with these trolls and give them a good warning! I thought there was a anti harassment law? ~ Leonie 
  •  This is appalling behavior from a sad bunch of people living in a country that itself was populated with immigrants just a few generations ago. I am a born and bred Singaporean and I am ashamed that this is happening. ~ Eddie

*****************************************************************************************

Comments to share :

  • I’m shocked that such a movement even exists here. I mean I’m all for keeping the population of Singapore under control, but that cause is being used as a guise for pure xenophobia and racism. As a Singaporean currently living overseas, it’s utterly embarrassing to see the hostility our people are showing towards foreign residents, especially when the majority of Singaporeans living overseas would themselves mix only with each other, join a local SG club to get to know even more Singaporeans while overseas, not bother to integrate, understand, or respect the host country’s culture at all, and also even take pains to fly interstate to participate in “Singapore day/SG national day” type events which normally exclude members of the host country from participation.For all the hospitality and tolerance afforded to Singaporeans overseas by their host countries, the way these Singaporeans in Singapore are responding to a Filipino national day event reeks of sheer hypocrisy and irony of the highest level!!!!!! ~ Ang
  • Well , not sure how someone can stop others to celebrate National day when just a few weeks back Singapore Day was celebrated in London  Sad .. Sad … During my stay in UK and US , there were celebration of India Day (on Indian Independence Day)… ~ Chandra

*******************************************************************************************

repost from :    Tan Chuan-Jin

I recently met the Filipino Ambassador during her farewell call. We talked about the experiences of Filipinos who live and work here. Notwithstanding the occasional negative issues, she was thankful for the kindness and hospitality that Singaporeans extended to her compatriots. Singapore was a safe place because of how Singaporeans treated others. 

Which was why I was somewhat startled by the Straits Times article on Thursday, April 17, 2014 that reported about the Filipino organisers of their independence day celebration in Singapore being targeted. That there are xenophobes wasn’t the surprising part since there are these sad elements in any society.

It was the reported 26,000 ‘likes’ for the page that “is against the celebration of the Philippine Independence Day here” that raised my brows. As it turned out, the reporting was inaccurate.

It was actually the post against the activity itself that garnered several hundred ‘likes’. The page that hosted it was the one that had the twenty-over thousand likes. Encouragingly, there have been many decent Singaporeans who have come forward to condemn the actions of these netizens.

Many of us have celebrated Singapore’s national day in other countries and cannot imagine what it would be like if attacked in this way.

Is there a gentle way to put this across? Sometimes, I think we should just call a spade a spade.

These actions by those who peddle hate are not acceptable, repulsive even. We should make a stand to say no to such bigotry. They do not reflect who we are as a people and as a nation.

Photo: I recently met the Filipino Ambassador during her farewell call. We talked about the experiences of Filipinos who live and work here. Notwithstanding the occasional negative issues, she was thankful for the kindness and hospitality that  Singaporeans extended to her compatriots. Singapore was a safe place because of how Singaporeans treated others. </p>
<p>Which was why I was somewhat startled by the Straits Times article on Thursday, April 17, 2014 that reported about the Filipino organisers of their independence day celebration in Singapore being targeted. That there are xenophobes wasn't the surprising part since there are these sad elements in any society. It was the reported 26,000 'likes' for the page that "is against the celebration of the Philippine Independence Day here" that raised my brows. </p>
<p>As it turned out, the reporting was inaccurate. It was actually the post against the activity itself that garnered several hundred 'likes'. The page that hosted it was the one that had the twenty-over thousand likes. Encouragingly, there have been many decent Singaporeans who have come forward to condemn the actions of these netizens.</p>
<p>Many of us have celebrated Singapore's national day in other countries and cannot imagine what it would be like if attacked in this way. </p>
<p>Is there a gentle way to put this across? Sometimes, I think we should just call a spade a spade. These actions by those who peddle hate are not acceptable, repulsive even. We should make a stand to say no to such bigotry. They do not reflect who we are as a people and as a nation.

****************************************************************************************

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s